Social Welfare Reform: Child Support Policies Bias?


Child support
Social Welfare Reform

Are Child Support policies Bias?


  States across the country use various means in order to calculate child support payments; the two primary methods being the income shares model, and the percentage of income model, the former being the most used. Income share calculations are not based on what it actually cost to raise a child; income share calculations are based on estimates in other words what raising a child is estimated to be. The philosophy of the income shares model is that it is no fault of the child that the parent is no longer together if in fact, they were ever a couple at all. Therefore the aim is to maintain the standard of living that existed before the divorce, or prior to the birth of the child. 


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 A percentage of income model the calculation is based on a percentage of the noncustodial parent's gross income, or the non-custodial parent's net income, which can be fixed and remain the same until the child is emancipated, or payments can fluctuate based on gains and losses in income. The income shares model takes into account both parents' income. However, the percentage of income model only takes into account the non-custodial income. Which do you think is the best method to use?  



Take a look at this video.



"Divorce Corp Director, Joseph Sorge, interviews renowned economist and lead author of a breakthrough study on the costs of raising a child, Professor William Comanor. Watch this video to learn the shocking facts about how child support costs are currently calculated and why they need to be revised."

Author on Inveigle Magazine


Author: Gregory M. Green is  the author of various topics in the Social Sciences section of Inveigle MagazineHe writes on informative topics that brings awareness to the world. We are so pleased to have him as a part of Inveigle Magazine's Team. Follow us @Inveiglemagazi1 View more articles by Gregory M. Green



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